on the way to the farm.jpg

Bespoke Tours

Tailor-made Experiences

 

In addition to our group tours and experiences, we also arrange bespoke, escorted tours and custom-made itineraries for small groups, couples and individuals. We can create an exclusive itinerary based on your budget, ideal dates of travel and your unique interests.

Here are some ideas of what to include in your itinerary…

 
The World-Famous Macchu Picchu. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.   High in the Andes of Peru, Machu Picchu is the site of an ancient Inca city. One of the most familiar symbols of the Incan empire, and often referred to as "The Lost City of the Incas"; it is also well-established as one of the most famous and spectacular sites of ruins in the world. A visit to Peru would not be complete without seeing it!

The World-Famous Macchu Picchu. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

High in the Andes of Peru, Machu Picchu is the site of an ancient Inca city. One of the most familiar symbols of the Incan empire, and often referred to as "The Lost City of the Incas"; it is also well-established as one of the most famous and spectacular sites of ruins in the world. A visit to Peru would not be complete without seeing it!

Tipón   A sprawling early 15th-century Inca ruin situated inside the Sacred Valley 3,400 meters above sea level. The complex covers 239 hectares and is located 22 kilometers southeast of Cusco. It consists of wide agricultural terraces irrigated by a network of water channels fed by a natural spring. Several surrounding ruins have been excavated, and many more are visible below the soil.  The site was probably used as a laboratory of agricultural products because of the various micro-climates found within the complex. Tipon is considered one of the most important archaeological tours for tourists who visit the area.  Besides being an archaeological complex, the site is home to one of the largest irrigation works in the terraces, with a great distribution of outdoor water channels.

Tipón

A sprawling early 15th-century Inca ruin situated inside the Sacred Valley 3,400 meters above sea level. The complex covers 239 hectares and is located 22 kilometers southeast of Cusco. It consists of wide agricultural terraces irrigated by a network of water channels fed by a natural spring. Several surrounding ruins have been excavated, and many more are visible below the soil.

The site was probably used as a laboratory of agricultural products because of the various micro-climates found within the complex. Tipon is considered one of the most important archaeological tours for tourists who visit the area.

Besides being an archaeological complex, the site is home to one of the largest irrigation works in the terraces, with a great distribution of outdoor water channels.

Pisac - (Pictured: The Terraces)   Pisac is perhaps best known for its Incan ruins, known as Inca Písac, which lie atop a hill at the entrance to the valley. The ruins are separated along the ridge into four groups:  P'isaqa ,  Inti Watana ,  Qalla Q'asa , and  Kinchiraqay .  Inti Watana  group includes the Temple of the Sun, baths, altars, water fountains,and a ceremonial platform.  Qalla Q'asa , which is built onto a natural spur and overlooks the valley, is known as the citadel.  The Inca constructed agricultural terraces on the steep hillside, which are still in use today. They created the terraces by hauling richer topsoil by hand from the lower lands. The terraces enabled the production of surplus food, more than would normally be possible at altitudes as high as 11,000 feet.  With military, religious, and agricultural structures, the site served at least a triple purpose. Researchers believe that Písac defended the southern entrance to the Sacred Valley, while Choquequirao defended the western entrance, and the fortress at Ollantaytambo the northern. Inca Pisac controlled a route which connected the Inca Empire with the border of the rain forest.  The sanctuary of  Huanca , site of a sacred shrine, is also near the village. Pilgrims travel to the shrine every September.

Pisac - (Pictured: The Terraces)

Pisac is perhaps best known for its Incan ruins, known as Inca Písac, which lie atop a hill at the entrance to the valley. The ruins are separated along the ridge into four groups: P'isaqa, Inti Watana, Qalla Q'asa, and Kinchiraqay. Inti Watana group includes the Temple of the Sun, baths, altars, water fountains,and a ceremonial platform. Qalla Q'asa, which is built onto a natural spur and overlooks the valley, is known as the citadel.

The Inca constructed agricultural terraces on the steep hillside, which are still in use today. They created the terraces by hauling richer topsoil by hand from the lower lands. The terraces enabled the production of surplus food, more than would normally be possible at altitudes as high as 11,000 feet.

With military, religious, and agricultural structures, the site served at least a triple purpose. Researchers believe that Písac defended the southern entrance to the Sacred Valley, while Choquequirao defended the western entrance, and the fortress at Ollantaytambo the northern. Inca Pisac controlled a route which connected the Inca Empire with the border of the rain forest.

The sanctuary of Huanca, site of a sacred shrine, is also near the village. Pilgrims travel to the shrine every September.

Shaman’s Retreat  -  (Pictured: View from the Retreat).   An unforgettable, authentic Peruvian experience. About an hours drive from Cusco through incredibly scenic vistas is our Shaman’s private retreat. Spend the night here in either a comfortable tent or dorm room and enjoy a hot meal round the camp fire under the stars. Join the Shaman in a special ceremony and enjoy being close to the stars and nature in a magical place of quiet and beauty.

Shaman’s Retreat - (Pictured: View from the Retreat).

An unforgettable, authentic Peruvian experience. About an hours drive from Cusco through incredibly scenic vistas is our Shaman’s private retreat. Spend the night here in either a comfortable tent or dorm room and enjoy a hot meal round the camp fire under the stars. Join the Shaman in a special ceremony and enjoy being close to the stars and nature in a magical place of quiet and beauty.

Sacsayhuamán - A UN World Heritage Site.   Located on a steep hill that overlooks the city of Cusco, the fortified complex has a wide view of the valley to the southeast. Archeological studies of surface collections of pottery at Sacsayhuamán indicate that the earliest occupation of the hilltop dates to about 900 CE.  Because of its location high above Cusco and its immense terrace walls, this area of Sacsayhuamán is frequently referred to as a fortress. The large plaza area, capable of holding thousands of people, is well designed for ceremonial activities. Several of the large structures at the site may also have been used during rituals.  The best-known zone of Sacsayhuamán includes its great plaza and its adjacent three massive terrace walls. The stones used in the construction of these terraces are among the largest used in any building in pre-Hispanic America. They display a precision of fitting that is unmatched in the Americas. The stones are so closely spaced that a single piece of paper will not fit between many of the stones. The longest of the three walls is about 400 meters. They are about 6 meters tall. The estimated volume of stone is over 6,000 cubic meters. Estimates for the weight of the largest  andesite  block vary from 128 tonnes to almost 200 tonnes.  Peruvians celebrate  Inti Raymi , the annual Inca festival of the winter solstice and new year. It is held near Sacsayhuamán on 24 June. Another important festival is  Warachikuy,  held annually on the third Sunday of September.

Sacsayhuamán - A UN World Heritage Site.

Located on a steep hill that overlooks the city of Cusco, the fortified complex has a wide view of the valley to the southeast. Archeological studies of surface collections of pottery at Sacsayhuamán indicate that the earliest occupation of the hilltop dates to about 900 CE.

Because of its location high above Cusco and its immense terrace walls, this area of Sacsayhuamán is frequently referred to as a fortress. The large plaza area, capable of holding thousands of people, is well designed for ceremonial activities. Several of the large structures at the site may also have been used during rituals.

The best-known zone of Sacsayhuamán includes its great plaza and its adjacent three massive terrace walls. The stones used in the construction of these terraces are among the largest used in any building in pre-Hispanic America. They display a precision of fitting that is unmatched in the Americas. The stones are so closely spaced that a single piece of paper will not fit between many of the stones. The longest of the three walls is about 400 meters. They are about 6 meters tall. The estimated volume of stone is over 6,000 cubic meters. Estimates for the weight of the largest andesite block vary from 128 tonnes to almost 200 tonnes.

Peruvians celebrate Inti Raymi, the annual Inca festival of the winter solstice and new year. It is held near Sacsayhuamán on 24 June. Another important festival is Warachikuy, held annually on the third Sunday of September.

Quillarumiyoc - The Temple of the Moon.   The  Temple of the Moon  is an  Incan  ceremonial temple on  Huayna Picchu  near  Machu Picchu , in Peru. The site is made up of stone masonry and an open-face, shallow cave. In the center of the cave is a throne carved out of rock. Beside the throne are steps that lead deeper into the cave. It is thought that the caves were used to hold mummies. The Temple of the Moon dates back 1500 years and was only rediscovered in 1936.  The Temple of the Moon consists of three structural components: an overhanging cave with superb stonework, a very tall double-jamb doorway beyond, and farther beyond, several structures including one that again uses a cave. The  stone work  in the Temple is said to contain the three planes of the  Incan  religion to be depicted: the  Hanan Pacha  (the heavens, or world of above), the Kay Pacha (the earth, or physical life), and the Ukju Pacha (the underworld, or world of below), represented respectively by the condor, the puma, and the  snake . The temple also boasts niches and fake doors inserted in the stones, with an enormous 8 meter high by 6 meter wide entrance. The premises are rectangular with the rocks of the mountains as walls. Its three doors are 1.60 meters high (in the front) and 1.00 m high (at the sides). Inside, there are six trapezoidal niches. The "temple", strictly speaking, consists of a major platform supporting a building which is raised 5 meters above the ground, with an 8-meter-high entrance. Huaca de la Luna (Temple of the Moon), contains 6 levels, built on top of the other during a 200-year span.  The purpose of building of the Temple is not exactly known. Keeping in mind that caves, like springs, were thought to be entrances for gods, they believe the Temple’s purpose was to be a place of worship to the Gods.  There is a theory that it must have been a royal tomb, place of worship and look-out post. Some believe that this was a place for sacrifices, because the structure has beautiful vaulted niches and empty trapezoids of typical Inca type and in front of the cavern, there is a rock sculpted in the shape of an altar. Others think Temple of the Moon was a ceremonial bathing complex.

Quillarumiyoc - The Temple of the Moon.

The Temple of the Moon is an Incan ceremonial temple on Huayna Picchu near Machu Picchu, in Peru. The site is made up of stone masonry and an open-face, shallow cave. In the center of the cave is a throne carved out of rock. Beside the throne are steps that lead deeper into the cave. It is thought that the caves were used to hold mummies. The Temple of the Moon dates back 1500 years and was only rediscovered in 1936.

The Temple of the Moon consists of three structural components: an overhanging cave with superb stonework, a very tall double-jamb doorway beyond, and farther beyond, several structures including one that again uses a cave. The stone work in the Temple is said to contain the three planes of the Incan religion to be depicted: the Hanan Pacha (the heavens, or world of above), the Kay Pacha (the earth, or physical life), and the Ukju Pacha (the underworld, or world of below), represented respectively by the condor, the puma, and the snake. The temple also boasts niches and fake doors inserted in the stones, with an enormous 8 meter high by 6 meter wide entrance. The premises are rectangular with the rocks of the mountains as walls. Its three doors are 1.60 meters high (in the front) and 1.00 m high (at the sides). Inside, there are six trapezoidal niches. The "temple", strictly speaking, consists of a major platform supporting a building which is raised 5 meters above the ground, with an 8-meter-high entrance. Huaca de la Luna (Temple of the Moon), contains 6 levels, built on top of the other during a 200-year span.

The purpose of building of the Temple is not exactly known. Keeping in mind that caves, like springs, were thought to be entrances for gods, they believe the Temple’s purpose was to be a place of worship to the Gods.

There is a theory that it must have been a royal tomb, place of worship and look-out post. Some believe that this was a place for sacrifices, because the structure has beautiful vaulted niches and empty trapezoids of typical Inca type and in front of the cavern, there is a rock sculpted in the shape of an altar. Others think Temple of the Moon was a ceremonial bathing complex.

Urco - Hidden in The Sacred Valley   Off the beaten track, this rare circular Inca building near Urco, in the Sacred Valley of Peru, was constructed as a solar observatory, with windows marking the winter solstice.

Urco - Hidden in The Sacred Valley

Off the beaten track, this rare circular Inca building near Urco, in the Sacred Valley of Peru, was constructed as a solar observatory, with windows marking the winter solstice.

The City of Cusco   Cusco, a city in the Peruvian Andes, was once capital of the Inca Empire, and is now known for its archaeological remains and Spanish colonial architecture. Plaza de Armas is the central square in the old city, with arcades, carved wooden balconies and Incan wall ruins. The baroque Santo Domingo Convent was built on top of the Incan Temple of the Sun (Qoricancha), and has archaeological remains of Inca stonework.

The City of Cusco

Cusco, a city in the Peruvian Andes, was once capital of the Inca Empire, and is now known for its archaeological remains and Spanish colonial architecture. Plaza de Armas is the central square in the old city, with arcades, carved wooden balconies and Incan wall ruins. The baroque Santo Domingo Convent was built on top of the Incan Temple of the Sun (Qoricancha), and has archaeological remains of Inca stonework.

Contact us for a quote, itinerary ideas or to check availability.